• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cocky
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Depressed
  • Down
  • Drunk
  • Embarrased
  • Enraged
  • Friendly
  • Geeky
  • Godly
  • Happy
  • Hateful
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Meh
  • Piratey
  • Poorly
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Sneaky
  • Tired
  • Wtf
  • Results 1 to 5 of 5
    1. #1
      Senior Member
      is starting into year 3!
       
      I am:
      Happy
       
      abcowboy's Avatar

      Join Date
      Sep 2014
      Location
      N.E. Alberta
      Posts
      1,990
      Post Thanks / Like

      Increasing the Price Decreases the Comsumption

      I found this interesting reading;

      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0207002026.htm

      Excerpt:

      A new study made available online February 7 in Addiction shows that, between 2002 and 2009, the percentage of deaths caused by alcohol in British Columbia, Canada dropped more than expected when minimum alcohol price was increased, while alcohol-related deaths increased when more private alcohol stores were opened. The paper has significant implications for international alcohol policy.

      The study was carried out by researchers from British Columbia, the westernmost province in Canada, using three categories of death associated with alcohol -- wholly alcohol attributable (AA), acute, and chronic, analysing death rates across the time period against increases in government set minimum prices of alcohol drinks.
      The study was complicated by another provincial policy which allowed partial privatisation of alcohol retail sales, resulting in a substantial expansion of alcohol stores. Previously, alcohol could only be sold directly to the public in government owned stores, unlike in Europe where it is widely available in supermarkets, off-licences and petrol stations. The researchers therefore had to both control for the effects of the wider availability of alcohol, and assess what effect this measure had on mortality rates.

      The major finding was that increased minimum alcohol prices were associated with immediate, substantial and significant reductions in wholly AA deaths:
      A 10% increase in the average minimum price for all alcoholic beverages was associated with a 32% reduction in wholly AA deaths
      Some of the effect was also detected up to a year after minimum price increases
      Significant reductions in chronic and total AA deaths were detected between two and three years after minimum price increases
      A 10% increase in private liquor stores was associated with a 2% increase in acute, chronic, and total AA mortality rates
      This overall drop in deaths was more than expected, and disproportionate to the size of the minimum price increase -- a minimum price increase of 1% was associated with a mortality decline of more than 3%.

      The authors suggest that the reason for the reduction in mortality is that increasing the price of cheaper drinks reduces the consumption of heavier drinkers who prefer these drinks. They note that other research has also suggested that impacts on some types of mortality may be delayed by one or two years after price increases.

      Dr. Tim Stockwell, director of the University of Victoria's Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia and a lead author, said "This study adds to the scientific evidence that, despite popular opinion to the contrary, even the heaviest drinkers reduce their consumption when minimum alcohol prices increase. It is hard otherwise to explain the significant changes in alcohol-related deaths observed in British Columbia."
      Quitting and staying quit isnít easy, itís learning a whole new way of thinking. Itís accepting a new way of life, and not just accepting it, embracing it...

    2. Thanks Otter thanked for this post
      Likes Otter liked this post
    3. #2
      Subscribers!
      is Happy
       
      I am:
      Meh
       
      NoraC's Avatar

      Join Date
      Jul 2009
      Location
      California
      Posts
      11,371
      Post Thanks / Like
      Thank you for this. I haven't had a chance to read it yet but very interesting.
      "Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me.".....Carol Burnett
      ..........
      AF - 7-27-15

    4. Likes abcowboy liked this post
    5. #3
      Senior Member
      is mainly dry and sunny
       
      I am:
      Happy
       
      Otter's Avatar

      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Cyprus
      Posts
      582
      Post Thanks / Like
      To be honest, I never found the price of alcohol diminished the drinking. I was, in fact, thankful of taking a holiday and getting cheap booze. We were going through about £250 a month on vodka. I think it probably helps to make people think about it, if they are able, but in very serious cases, I'm not so sure. I suppose statistically there is an impact. I did have a conversation about this with someone, can't remember who, that back in the "olden days" a bottle of spirits cost a week's wages and that is what really helped make people not get addicted, and there was no decent social security. A lot of social security recipients just collect their money each week and go straight to the liquor store. Now we have mass production etc what is the chance that the price is ever going to make a huge dent?

      The other problem is what we see with drug addiction, that it is very expensive so the addiction drives acquisitive crimes like theft and burglaries where people without a decent income are committing criminal offences to fund their addiction.
      Last edited by Otter; 02-14-2017 at 10:25 AM.
      BACLOFENISTA

      baclofenuk.com

      http://www.theendofmyaddiction.org





      Olivier Ameisen

      In addiction, suppression of symptoms should suppress the disease altogether since addiction is, as he observed, a "symptom-driven disease". Of all "anticraving medications used in animals, only one - baclofen - has the unique property of suppressing the motivation to consume cocaine, heroin, alcohol, nicotine and d-amphetamine"

    6. Likes abcowboy, NoraC liked this post
    7. #4
      Senior Member
      is mainly dry and sunny
       
      I am:
      Happy
       
      Otter's Avatar

      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Cyprus
      Posts
      582
      Post Thanks / Like
      I also like to distinguish between scientific research, as one would do on a mouse by exposing it to a chemical and observing the result, and statistical research. Then, within scientific research, I like to look at the exact mechanism of a drug. For instance, baclofen works by suppressing anxiety by acting on the GABA B receptor. Naltrexone, on the other hand, works on a different receptor so it has a different mechanism from baclofen and works in a different way in the brain. If you want to replace alcohol in the brain, then you take Naltrexone and it gives your brain a similar tweek. It's like smoking cannabis instead of drinking alcohol. You get a similar high so you feel less like drinking. That's only an analogy and I don't pretend to be a scientist.

      I attended the colloquium in Paris in September and gave a talk about criminal cases involving alcohol. I had written a paper on the subject and had submitted it and they liked the ideas in it. Essentially, it comes at baclofen theory from a different angle in that it shows that the link between violence and alcohol consumption has to do with anxiety and not the consumption of alcohol itself. Alcohol may make things worse but there isn't any scientific support showing that just drinking alcohol makes people violent and commit violent offences. It's something a lot of my criminal clients told me when I was practicing criminal law as a defence lawyer. I never thought much of it and tended to ignore what they were saying or just trot it out in mitigation of what they had done as a way of saying they felt they had some kind of mental problem and that ordinarily they are law abiding citizens. But, when I did the research I couldn't find anything other than a statistical association between drinking and violent crime. I couldn't find any research showing a cause and effect relationship. What I found was a causal connection between certain types of brain disorders and damage related to the same area of the brain that Ameisen talks about. In short, violence of an uncontrolled and spontaneous nature, is just a severe anxiety reaction and in people who have a deficiency in this area of the brain, ie., the limbic region, they have a problem with controlling that are of the brain. Alcohol features because these people use it as a medication, and it compounds the problem because it affects other areas of the brain and diminishes their awareness and judgment etc. It's a very complex area but the points I made don't appear to have been made by anyone else. This is part of my issue with saying that baclofen is just the same as other drugs, because other drugs don't deal with this anxiety and the theory behind it shows this link between anxiety, violence, alcoholism and also a treatment, so it is very useful in terms of illustrating the issues and providing a response to it.
      BACLOFENISTA

      baclofenuk.com

      http://www.theendofmyaddiction.org





      Olivier Ameisen

      In addiction, suppression of symptoms should suppress the disease altogether since addiction is, as he observed, a "symptom-driven disease". Of all "anticraving medications used in animals, only one - baclofen - has the unique property of suppressing the motivation to consume cocaine, heroin, alcohol, nicotine and d-amphetamine"

    8. #5
      Senior Member
      is mainly dry and sunny
       
      I am:
      Happy
       
      Otter's Avatar

      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Cyprus
      Posts
      582
      Post Thanks / Like

      Re: Increasing the Price Decreases the Comsumption

      I have been trying for years to elevate the discussion of baclofen to the academic and scientific level rather than as banter among users and skeptics. When I first came here I was immediately troubled by the fact that non-medical people were giving advice on taking an unknown neurological drug. I set about trying to get a doctor to help but had severe difficulty, far more than is warranted, in my opinion. I put my thoughts and research onto the Baclofenuk blog I set up and I did that to share it with others and to use to show doctors I was speaking to so they would see why they should presribe. I have to say that despite the site having had thousands of views, including by senior doctors, nothing much has changed in terms of getting doctors to prescribe baclofen, outside France.

      I got very frustrated by this so I asked Olivier Ameisen if I could set up a foundation in his name, to which he agreed. I'm not a doctor or a scientist so the function of the site is to advocate for change. I don't think chat forums are hugely effective in that role so I decided a while ago to leave my views and advocacy out of this forum and to focus on legal matters on my site which is in the link below entitled "Baclofenista". I have posted there a video of my presentation at the colloquium in Paris so you can see my ugly face if you want.

      I have also posted on the site a paper I wrote which resulted in my attending at the colloquium and for ease of access, here is the link to it: https://theameisenfoundation.files.w...al-final-e.pdf

      I figure I should put my money where my mouth is and stand up for what I believe to be the right way forward in the treatment of this illness. It's a very serious matter and not one to be taken lightly. Certainly, everything helps and its a matter of individual choice as to the best method but my attitude is that iany illness should FIRST be looked at as an illness, by a doctor, and that just isn't happening yet.
      Last edited by Otter; Yesterday at 01:57 AM.
      BACLOFENISTA

      baclofenuk.com

      http://www.theendofmyaddiction.org





      Olivier Ameisen

      In addiction, suppression of symptoms should suppress the disease altogether since addiction is, as he observed, a "symptom-driven disease". Of all "anticraving medications used in animals, only one - baclofen - has the unique property of suppressing the motivation to consume cocaine, heroin, alcohol, nicotine and d-amphetamine"

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •