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Thread: Gardening

  1. #1
    Registered User. DizzyBee's Avatar

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    Gardening

    I'd like this gardening thread to be a place where we can talk about gardens, boast or complain with or without the help of pics, ask questions and simply tell each other how much we love gardening.

    Some of you may think this thread belongs in the General section but there is a reason I'm putting this here. As much as I want to involve all gardeners I would also like to see what gardening means to others in terms of spirituality and perhaps more importantly seeing the nature of this site - how we can use it a tool for to encourage sobriety. We may even uncover some new truths. :leaf:

    Thank you for reading this and I hope this *grows* into something beautiful.


  2. #2
    Registered User. DizzyBee's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Spiritual Gardening by Peg Streep

    Here is an excerpt from this book that I found very beautiful. Just to add my own two cents - gardening always gives me that little sense of amazement, nothing else you can do except give birth gives you that sense of helping god in the creation process. So whether you are an old time gardener, used to garden but 'relapsed' cos of the bottle, think you don't have green fingers, or claim to have no space - I think everyone can gain something from our green friends. Even if you just put 3 pots of herbs on your kitchen sill. And there aint no such thing as green fingers, all you need is a little green in your heart and a bit of effort and the rest is sure to follow.





    I found it on this website: SoulfulLiving.com - Feature Article on Spiritual Gardening - Gardening as a Spiritual Tool, by Peg Streep - Soulful Living

    "When we garden we reconnect ourselves to the slow rhythms of the cosmos. Our knees in the dirt, our faces close to the ground, we dig in the soil and see the myriad forms of life hidden to us when we are upright and walking: the earthworm tunneling through the soil, the outlined whiteness of the grub, the sticky trail of the slug. The perfumes of the garden—the rich loamy smell of water-laden soil or the acrid bite of the geranium—revive us and remind us that the world has a palette of scent as well as color. The sweetness of a berry and the cool note of mint encompass a range of taste and feeling, and teach a lesson in opposites. We breathe deep as our fingers work the soil, and marvel at the texture of the visible world: the soft fuzz of a begonia’s leaf, the pansy’s fragile velvet, the feathery lightness of dill. And then there is the music of a garden, set apart from the noise-filled world in which we usually live: the evening call of the summer cicada or the whisper of grasses, the crackle of fallen leaves underfoot.

    Gardening also helps us come to terms with the cycle of human life. Many of us tend to see our lives as linear, moving from points A to B in progression, with birth and death at opposite ends of the continuum, but the garden teaches another lesson entirely. In nature, beginnings and endings, birth and death, are inseparable: implicit in the flower’s blooming is its dying-off as well as its eventual renewal. The perennials in our winter garden—dead aboveground, still awake below—teach us about time and hidden mysteries. The withered annual is a symbol of the larger pattern that extends beyond us and our gardens: Seeds borne by the wind and birds bring small pieces of our lives into other places and other lives, making new, if unseen, connections. Planting seeds makes us active participants in the cycle of life, while tending our gardens teaches us about larger patterns of the cycle that are beyond our control. We learn patience from the long wait from planting to sprouting to blooming, as we learn acceptance when nature takes its own course. We gain humility when we catch a true glimpse of the extraordinary complexity of the natural world.

    With all of our senses engaged, seeing becomes understanding in the garden. Just as the medieval monks could see God’s presence in His handiwork and could make it the starting point for a meditation, so, too, we are learning to go into the garden to glimpse the “larger pattern”—regardless of what we name it—which seems to elude us in the other details of our everyday lives. This book was written and designed so that these experiences could be shared; our lives are enriched when we understand that the seeds in our hands are the promise of tomorrow."

  3. #3
    Registered User. DizzyBee's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Worm Farms

    OK, I have to go shower but I have a 1003 voices yelling at me to write this one before I do. That would be my Red Wriggler worms Miso Scared 1-1003 who lives in a very plush 3 story plastic worm farm with a little tap to extract 'worm tea' and everything.



    Now I have two very healthy cats and a bouncy dog but for some reason I'm not the world's best worm mommy. My last batch of worms died. Admittedly I was drunk/hungover 24/7 and they died during a heatwave as I forgot to give them enough water. I still feel guilty so please don't judge me.

    Anyhoo, even before they went to the big wormfarm in the sky they didnt seem to multiply as much as other people's worms do and I did look after them well pretty much most of the time.

    So does anyone here have a flourishing worm farm and can you give me some do and don't tips please? Miso Scared 1-1003 and I would be much obliged.



    This is not my worms, Miso Scared 1-1003 are camera shy.

    PS: I named them after I read Determinators post last night, so thanks Det.

  4. #4
    Registered User. DizzyBee's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Save My Worms!

    OK, I have to go shower but I have a 1003 voices yelling at me to write this one before I do. That would be my Red Wriggler worms Miso Scared 1-1003 who lives in a very plush 3 story plastic worm farm with a little tap to extract 'worm tea' and everything.



    Now I have two very healthy cats and a bouncy dog but for some reason I'm not the world's best worm mommy. My last batch of worms died. Admittedly I was drunk/hungover 24/7 and they died during a heatwave as I forgot to give them enough water. I still feel guilty so please don't judge me.

    Anyhoo, even before they went to the big wormfarm in the sky they didnt seem to multiply as much as other people's worms do and I did look after them well pretty much most of the time.

    So does anyone here have a flourishing worm farm and can you give me some do and don't tips please? Miso Scared 1-1003 and I would be much obliged.



    This is not my worms, Miso Scared 1-1003 are camera shy.

    PS: I named them after I read Determinators post last night, so thanks Det.

  5. #5
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    Gardening

    I am a gardening newby and inspired by Ms Dizzy am loving my new hobby. I have palnted some bushy kinds of plants in my garden, about 10 of them, I have 3 fruit trees and have now bought some bedding plants to grow lovely flowers in pots for me and the bees to enjoy and Ive also got some carrot and beans seeds. The new things arnt planted yet because it hasnt stopped raining since I got them oh and Ive also planted a few sprouty potatoes. I am actually finding it very exciting at the moment and I am amazed when things actually grow for me as I know nothing about gardening really and have two dogs that make a mess out there so will never have a manicured lawn but I dont care about that.

    I have also just got today from Amazon the dvd of Jamie at home, its Jamie Oliver at his annoying but inspiring best mixing growing food and cooking it, I have enjoyed watching it, and cant wait to plant the seeds out of the next peppers I use in my cooking

  6. #6
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    Gardening

    I just got back from the school and am having a quick cuppa before I go and try to get the planting done while the rain keeps off, I hope so I will have to be quick.

    xxx

  7. #7
    Registered User. DizzyBee's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Hi Space

    I see no one has saved my worms yet

    This magazine also looks interesting: Grow Your Own | Growing Vegetables | Gardening Tips & Advice | GYO Fruit & Veg Magazine

    Jeez, I feel like making up with bf just so I can go to London to buy the mag.

    So, how far did you get with the Jamie series and did you learn anything? I love his garden and his gardener even though he does look a bit stoned all the time. Hey, I'm no judging.


  8. #8
    Registered User. blondie's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Hi Dizzy
    Love your worm farm - am thinking of getting one now the scorching summer heat has passed; I know they would end up frazzled otherwise!

    Tried to upload a couple of garden (and doggie) photos, but (obviously) wasn't successful - will go back and read your instructions (perhaps not simple enough for me!)

    Space - Love Jamie's garden (and house) but he does grate quite a bit and his gardener reminds me of a 60s hippie friend who always had a little relaxing something to puff on!!

    DB - will read your links later, but they look interesting! Why don't you ask bf to get you a subscription to the mag -might make him wonder what your plans are!!

  9. #9
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    Gardening

    I have managed to do a few pots before the rain has started. I am most of the way through the series !!! I am going to try the idea of potatoes in bags, I have put some in the ground but I dont know how they will grow with the dogs walking on them, my dad also used to grow tomartoes in buckets so I want to try that, he had a greenhouse tho but I know I dont need one need one for tomartoes. I am sure they will taste lovely grown with love:h, my son loves cherry toms so I want to grow those for him. No clue where Im can put carrots and lettuce tho

  10. #10
    Forum Subscriber. Lavande's Avatar

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    Gardening

    Hi Dizzy,

    I love my garden but am making it a bit smaller this year. Last summer I had way too much food & couldn't find enough people to give it too.

    I have a perennial herb garden right outside my door with parsley, rosemary, thyme, chives, chocolate mint, lemon balm, dill & more
    In the big garden so far I have brussel sprouts, broccoli, swiss chard & a few tomato plants in & growing very happily due to my never ending supply of chicken poop fertilizer :H
    I have lettuces growing in large boxes on my deck for easy picking.
    I'm still wanting to get some zucchini & cucumber plants in & hopefully will this weekend if it doesn't rain - oh & green beans of course.

    I love putting my hands in the dirt, don't love the weeding so much but the home grown produce is fantastic. Pictures to follow

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