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doubter
June 4th, 2008, 06:42 PM
Hi everybody,

Started this thread to share a very peculiar experience.

I quit alcohol three months back after finding this site.

For the past 17 years, running has been my regular fitness activity. I was inspired to take up jogging / running after reading 'Aerobics' by Dr. Kenneth Cooper which has become my fitness bible since then. This is a book published way back in 1968 and although a lot of further insights and knowledge have been added to the field of fitness, this book is reputed to have brought about a fitness revolution. The USP of the book is its precise quantification of fitness levels and the detailed programs to reach our optimum level of fitness.

According to Dr. Cooper, any male between 20 to 60 and without any significant medical problems should be able to run atleast 1.5 miles ( 2.4 km) in 12 minutes. This is six rounds on the standard track. This has been defined as category-IV fitness and if one is not able to reach this, by following a clearly delineated fitness program, one can reach this fitness level within 8 - 12 weeks.

I took up running as a fitness activity at age 20 ( never was remotely athletic btw) and for the past 17 years tried to keep up this category-IV level of fitness. Was a heavy smoker during this period and 3 -4 years back, in my early-thirties could not maintain this level of fitness even after regular runs. I almost thought that smoking had damaged my fitness permanently.

Gave up smoking 1 1/2 years ago and immediately within three months could again climb back to category -IV fitness. :)

All through these years, whenever I stopped working out for any significant period of time, I had to run for atleast a couple of months before climbing upto category IV fitness.

Now coming to the point. I stopped my running routine in January this year. Have stopped drinking since March, but have not done any regular physical exercise for the last three months except for sporadically doing breathing exercises(pranayama). Two weeks ago, I walked into the gym and was curious to check my fitness level. Took the 12 minute test and was astounded to complete 2.5 km in 12 minutes! Never in the past 17 years have I been able to do this - stay at category -IV fitness without any significant fitness routine! The only change in my lifestyle has been giving up alcohol.

Secondly, in these three months of being sober, I also have lost one-and-a-half inches from my none too significant waist ( 33 1/2 inches to 32 inches) again just by giving up alcohol. Talk about empty calories!

The lesson is crystal clear to me. All this while, alcohol was affecting my fitness adversely and the present improved fitness level gives me added motivation to stay al-free.

Just wanted to share my experience with all friends here.

Warm Regards

LessofaDoubter:)

time2change
June 6th, 2008, 06:19 PM
Doubter
It really is amazing in how many ways alcohol affects us. It's even more amazing that we don't see it at the time. Three months has brought about many positive changes for you. I'm glad that you are motivated to continue on. Imagine the additional positive changes that you will see in another 3 months. I'm so glad that you are LessofaDoubter.

tlrgs
June 6th, 2008, 06:34 PM
thankx for sharing ..doubter.. keep up the great work .. you have done an awesome job..
peace , love and god bless

Tiny
June 6th, 2008, 08:17 PM
Doubter -- great observation ... I believe that eliminating Al gives us more all around energy and perhaps that is why your fitness level was easily attainable -- since you've stopped have you been more productive in other areas? I know for me that when I am drinking it is me, my mine, the TV an my dogs. When I am not drinking (which is day 11) I have been a ball of energy!!!!

I am going to attempt the fitness test tomorrow!!! (NOT!)

Cinders
June 6th, 2008, 11:01 PM
Doubter,

Thanks for sharing that. It really shows what effect alcohol has on us in terms of wearing the body down.

Really glad to "see" you again and very happy to hear you are doing so well. :)

Love,
Cindi

Determinator
June 7th, 2008, 11:23 AM
Doubter, great post!

I've also found that al consumption definitely slows my O2 uptake. I used to wheeze like a freight train at workout, but now I'm much more calm and my cardio is better for no other reason than giving up the toxic brew.

meditation mama
June 7th, 2008, 11:51 AM
Good for you, Doubter!!

I am also a grateful recipient of a healty outcome after kicking AL out the door. I jumped back into a fitness routine a month ago after giving up AL for three months. I was also astounded at my energy level. I went for a hike last weekend and thought, maybe I would make it halfway to where I used to go.. not only did I make it to the top, I almost sprinted the whole way!! I have also lost 20 pounds since January..

Yes, indeed.. a great motivator!

Thanks for sharing your experience. Keep up the good work!

MM

TryingHard
June 8th, 2008, 10:49 AM
I'm constantly surprised by my increased energy levels when I refrain from drinking...I often wish I could undo the unhealthy-ness of my past 8 years.

As someone who suffers from various lung conditions, I find consumption of alcohol has an adverse affect on my cardiovascular health - something my doctors refuse to commit to agreeing to.

headless1
June 19th, 2008, 11:22 PM
Just 3 weeks AF

...and I have begun riding my bike for the first time in several years. Dusted it off and went on 2nd ride today. Forgot how much I love being outside and pumping the pedals. Today I thought maybe I will go on a long ride that I used to do, 21 miles. Not ready yet, but just to think I wanted to go was amazing for me. Three weeks ago I would have laughed at the thought of it. Looking forward to all the great rides and the way it makes me feel. So from here on I plan to use the momentum of exercise to build on my AF lifestyle. Amazing-day 23 ...I'm psyched. Just need to stay away from triggers and people who don't respect the fact that I choose not to drink. If I do fall though I know that I can get back up and do this if I want. Good to have a place to vent and also be inspired by others. thanks for listening

H

doubter
June 20th, 2008, 01:48 AM
Cooper's 12 minute test

Hello everybody!

This is in continuation to my first post on this thread.

I've just copied below a link to a detailed table indicating desired levels of aerobic fitness for both males and females of all ages. This is as per the Cooper's 12 minute test :

Test your fitness with the Cooper Test (http://www.bijlmakers.com/cooper/cooper.htm)


In my opinion, everybody who feels up to it, upto the age of 60 and without any medical complications & following a regular exercise routine, can try the 12 minute test to assess his/her fitness levels.

headless, nice to see that you are channelising your newfound energy in dusting up your bike. Just post again to share your experience of the 21 mile ride! All the best.

FallenAngel
June 20th, 2008, 10:05 AM
thank you!

I wanted you to be the first to know Doubter..... after we got off of yahoo this morning, I did my 30 minutes of NordicTrack... and it felt wonderful! :)
I was a bit concerned that I would find it tough to do, after all these set-backs I've had over the past several months... but it felt like I had picked up where I had left off.... I could have so easily gone for another 20 minutes or more (just started getting into the zone)... but ran out of time.
(the dreaded drain plug again.... lol)
I can see that I will soon be back up to 60 minutes with the NordicTrack & also doing my strength/cardio workouts again! I feel so ecstatic about this!
Thank you for being there for me then.... now.... and always :l



I'm in such a good mood right now, I'll even let you call me 'Doubter'sBunny' for the day! lmao

doubter
June 21st, 2008, 06:24 AM
Great!

Way to go Angel! Just take it slow and steady.

I now remember, in November last year, suddenly jumped into playing shuttle badminton, which can be strenuous if you choose it to be.Was playing on cement flooring, and on the third day, bam! felt a sudden jerk in my lower back, and had to be almost bedridden for the next couple of days.

Moral of the story, take it nice and easy & crank the exercise routine up gradually.

I'll be keen to hear updates.

bunny-in-arms
D

FallenAngel
June 24th, 2008, 11:58 AM
I did my workout!


doubter;350645 wrote: Way to go Angel! Just take it slow and steady.
I'm glad to see that you didn't put 'slow & steady' in the same sentence as my name! :H

Did you get to the gym today??? I kept my promise, and am here to check in...oh, and I looked at those tables...now what??? lol (btw....those cartoon figures are...ummmmm... a nice addition) tee hee

I did NordicTrack yesterday, and today I did my first cardio/strength video workout since late Feb.... it felt great to get back into doing those fun moves!
I love the classic Firm workouts.... they use low step boxes for part of their cardio work, high step boxes (14") for sculpting hips & thighs, and a range of different weight dumbells for strength training. The music is motivating & the moves are fun... I guess it takes me back to the ol' cheerleading days... now that probably got a good laugh from you, didn't it?? :H No doubt it's hard for you to imagine Angel cheering people on, instead of throwing rocks or kicking someone's butt if they don't stay in line! LOL
Kind of sad to look back & see that this was the time of my life when AL & partying started to become the main focus...taking over other interests that I had.



I consider my Nordictracking totally different than my cardio/strength workouts. The NordicTrack is a repetitious form of exercise...I can do this first thing in the morning, it's mindless...just crank up the tunes & go for it until I get into 'the zone'.... and from there on (happens around the 25 minute mark for me).... is sheer bliss. My other workouts might get me into the zone, but the effect is totally different... the moves are complex & always changing, so the mind needs to stay alert, so I think for these workouts, being in 'the zone' is a way for the body to get through the ordeal! lol

Like I said, just checking in...hope you have a great day... if I don't show up tomorrow morning in yahoo, you'll know that I'm seized up from my workout & can't get out of bed! :H :H :H

doubter
June 30th, 2008, 06:44 AM
My new fitness plan

Angel & all other friends here on mwo !

Bumped this thread up to record my thoughts and my new resolution.

Its now four months since I first came to MWO and from then on, haven't touched a drop of alcohol. ( smirnoff was my poision-of-choice - still am in sort of awe with their marketing strategies. Let's admit, poison selling sure is a fine art! ).

As I mentioned in my first post in this thread, have found that my aerobic fitness has really been upto the mark in this four months, definitely because of being alcohol-free . At present I've arrested the two major debilitating addictions of my life - smoking and alcohol - and have been hitting the gym regularly .

I've taken part in a five kilometer run in January '08 and for a first time runner, ended with a reasonable time of 28 minutes.

As I've completed four months of sobriety, I was contemplating on my goals for the next four months. Have sporadically been an amateur running enthusiast , so now I resolve to use some of the free time (alcohol was stealing away time-probably our most important resource) available to achieve long-cherished fitness goals.

One of these is taking part in a ten kilometer run. I've now printed a schedule from runners world ( Runner's World.Com : Running, Racing, Training and More. (http://www.runnersworld.com)) which gives a detailed plan to reach fitness levels required to do a 10 km run, within sixteen weeks.

The schedule starts with about 9 miles of running in the first week- three sessions a week- and gradually working up to about 20 miles by week 15.

Putting this post up , as a tool for motivation , a log of my actual performance and also to request any one who would like to start a fitness routine to join as partners.

Its monsoon here in eastern India where I reside, so we shall be having heavy rains for the next two months and hence running out in the open will not be possible. All my running has to be on the treadmill for the next 1-2 months.

I count yesterday's run on the treadmill as my first run. I ran for 30 minutes at 10.1 kmph; distance 5.1 km. Reasonable start. Next run scheduled on Tuesday- tomorrow. Repeat of the first session.

Are you listening Angel? Do I hear the NordicTrack already creaking frenetically , trying to keep pace with Doubter....:H:H:H


LessofaDoubter

FallenAngel
June 30th, 2008, 10:12 PM
doubter;355332 wrote: Are you listening Angel? Do I hear the NordicTrack already creaking frenetically , trying to keep pace with Doubter....
It didn't today :stomper: ... but I bet you're not going to hand out any demerit points, are you???
Wonder if this would help my fitness goals?? :hateputer:


:no:
No??? Don't like that idea??
Okay you tell me... how do I make time for :baaah: & :ranger & :bedtime: ??

doubter
July 1st, 2008, 02:16 AM
FallenAngel;355814 wrote: It didn't today :stomper:
Wonder if this would help my fitness goals?? :hateputer:
Okay you tell me... how do I make time for :baaah: & :ranger & :bedtime: ??
roflmao!!
yes...we sure have a third addiction to take care of pronto now - our addiction to the Net in general and mwo in particular.

And you also know, if I am asked for my opinion, I would be inclined to attack the third option.....:H

Knowing you as well as I do, I'm pretty sure that you shall crank up your fitness routine at the earliest. NordicTrack is sure beckoning!

Keep posting.

LessD

zed
November 2nd, 2008, 01:58 AM
Good for you mate - I'm quitting for the same reason. Have become a lazy, depressive, pathetic f&^k to be brutally honest, and it's time I reclaim myself and my sprit. If it means quitting the sauce, then so be it. But I will be alive again, and that is my ultimate revenge on all the things that have been driving me to drink of late - bullshit exs included.

cheers to you!

startingover
November 2nd, 2008, 02:06 AM
Couldnt have put it better myself Zed!
Think you summed me up very well in your first sentence.
Taking the dogs out NOW for a VERY brisk walk :o)
Have a great day!

zed
November 2nd, 2008, 04:30 AM
Ok, so the walk is done. Through the leafy streets of the Embassy District of Beijing... it's late Autumn, the leaves are falling, the wind is brisk and the light is ethereal. On the way back, I almost went over to a cafe to pick up some oily sandwich for dinner, but chose not to, since I have some salad laying around waiting to be eaten. Also worth a note: I passed my booze shop on the walk... didn't stop. Which means there's no booze in the house tonight (except for 6 cans of beers that have been laying in my fridge for a couple of months -- for the record, I don't consider any light beer (lagers) as a real drink and I never touch the stuff. So it's safely just going to remain there in case I have a guest come by home. So it's a night of sobriety coming up. Day 1. Itching though needless to say. But I am quietly confident! Ok, time to hit the mill and do some presses. Then a shower, dinner and a movie. Have a great day ALL! I am getting to the end of Nov 2, a lot of you are just beginning it. All the BEST!

gyco
November 2nd, 2008, 06:21 AM
doubter,i had to respond,you have made a great accomplsihment,and my hat is off to you,be careful xercise doesnt take control of you.som mite get angry with me beleive me or not even in drinking we strived for more,i beleive you are 37,back in 1989 i found running also,over wt,185 lbs,dropped to 157 within a month and 5 days,over acheiver ,just like drink,in a 10 year span,i ran 12 marathons,12 ten mile road races,the 10 being the oldest 10 in caada,thunderbay,4 half marathons,a few 5 ks and 10ks,I like many am an over doer,just like drinking,slow and easy,your bod will last longer gyco

caysea
November 2nd, 2008, 02:15 PM
Hi All
I think gyco has a very valid point .Many of us have been addicted to many different things in our lives.Some choices better than others.I Had been very involved in different sports and always took them to the point of becoming totally consumed. Running, tennis biking etc..I am just now stepping back and putting more balance in my routine.I used tennis and physical activity to break out of the grip of al but now I have to balance my rest recovery,nutrition and the rest of my life.I need to feel stronger and considering that I am not young anymore I realize that my rest days are as important as my workout days. Yes it's great to get involved with any physical activity but Don't let it run you down to the fatigue state .Be careful of getting injured .They can lead to excuses to "slip"

Stay Healthy and Keep Fighting
AF 5-16-08

startingover
November 2nd, 2008, 02:47 PM
Very true Caysea. I used to run pretty obsessively, damaged my knees and then had to more or less stop. So what did I do? Stop altogether. I want to get back to it but gently this time

veritas
December 29th, 2008, 08:03 AM
I'm also starting running slowly again. I used to run long, long distances. There certainly is an addictive quality. It's still better than booze, though.

I am finding that now that I am achieving more and more AF days, my energy level is fantastic. My biggest problem with that is that I cannot afford to get bored. Boredom is the biggest reason for my relapse. I sometimes think that my mind races like a freight train. Were it not that I seldom get depressed, I would suspect bi-polar.. I think that it might be anxiety based though.

I have agreed to run a 5km race with my daughter on New Years day. It's the most wonderful way of welcoming the new year, fresh, sober and hopeful.

5thaday
December 30th, 2008, 08:43 PM
This was quite a good post. I'm a runner myself, and although alcohol hasn't affected my athletic performance or cardiovascular fitness in general, in periods of abstention I have noticed an even greater improvement to my health from my exercise regime, despite the fact that I still feel healthy even while I'm drinking. It is definitely true that the damage caused by alcohol is subtle.

doubter
January 1st, 2009, 07:43 AM
greetings

Wishing veritas, 5thaday and all mwoers a very happy New Year.


Veritas, nice to know that you've planned to usher in the new year with a 5K run. I too have started the new year on the right note, running a practice run of 5 K + in the morning. I'm preparing to take part in a 5 K run on Jan 24th for which I am running on alternate days.

Since being AF, I am able to exercise more optimally than ever. As pointed out, my energy levels are up. Also, I am able to be far more disciplined now since quitting drinking. No more late nights, so no more hungover mornings. Also more free time available for engaging in fulfilling activities.

5thaday! Nice to meet a runner on the forum. I am a true penguin - an amateur running enthusiast - and I run for the pure joy of the activity. Look forward to knowing you better.
:)
Karmayogi

In Details
January 3rd, 2009, 02:40 PM
:new:
veritas;505144 wrote: I'm also starting running slowly again. I used to run long, long distances. There certainly is an addictive quality. It's still better than booze, though.

I am finding that now that I am achieving more and more AF days, my energy level is fantastic. My biggest problem with that is that I cannot afford to get bored. Boredom is the biggest reason for my relapse. I sometimes think that my mind races like a freight train. Were it not that I seldom get depressed, I would suspect bi-polar.. I think that it might be anxiety based though.

I have agreed to run a 5km race with my daughter on New Years day. It's the most wonderful way of welcoming the new year, fresh, sober and hopeful.
:new: Me too adding to my AA meeting since last october I start running. I joined the running room clinic.
I did one 5 k race in December 6.. I was attending the clinic 3 time a week an go to meeting 3 time a week ... I stay sober but with the occasional drink... I did enjoy my sobriety.. I like my wine.. Same problem as you I can afford to get bored...

nowandzen11
January 5th, 2009, 07:17 PM
I am very happy to have found this thread. I have been an athletic person my whole life.

I also have drank for many many years of my life.

Now that I am becoming more conscious of everything and doing a lot of reflection, I realized that alcohol does so many negatives things to a person.

Deep down in my soul, I crave to be healthy again and to the fitness level I once was.

I am not a runner nor have I ever been. For some reason, long distance running bores me. My 3 sports of choice are tennis, volleyball and basketball. I played tennis on a tournament level as a ranked player and used to practice with men so I could increase my strength in hitting. I played volleyball in college and later played in 2 on 2 leagues.

Now I sit here and wonder what the hell happened to me? I guess as bad things happened in my life, I replaced working out with drinking and over the years have diminished my ability to last a long time when excercising. I know I am ready now to start again. When I have worked out in the past 6 months, I've been surprised at my endurance. It is better than I thought. I am only 2 days af after 9 days. I am resting my body and ridding of the toxins and will start excercise in a few days. I know that now as I am middle aged, it takes at least 5-6 days for me to have energy again after drinking. I don't smoke unless I drink so I really do it up when I decide to drink.

I'm tired of it. It's no fun anymore. I dream of playing tennis again and being active everyday of my life.

Doubt and everyone- thanks for the posts. They have given me the motivation I need.

n/z

Solutionisme
January 5th, 2009, 08:18 PM
Good Stuff. I'm 57 and read the book in 1974 and ran ever since. I rememeber reading in that book Dr. Cooper claiming if you could keep running for 6 weeks...you would'nt give it up. Very true. The only thing I enjoyed more than running was the drinking I did afterwards or each nite having convinced myself I deserved it. I am currently in day 5 my latest commitment to live normal. I quit the first time for 16 years (78-94), the 2nd time for 16 months....and now Im in day 5 the 3rd time. Whew! This is without a doubt the hardest time I have had...the cravings incredible. The lesson....if you have stopped don't start. Each time the difficulty to get up the self control compounds. I am glad the running is even motivating for you now that you are sober. That is very cool. Good Luck with your new life. It's Great.

Solutionisme
January 5th, 2009, 08:31 PM
Good Stuff. I'm 57 and read the book in 1974 and ran ever since. I rememeber reading in that book Dr. Cooper claiming if you could keep running for 6 weeks...you would'nt give it up. Very true. The only thing I enjoyed more than running was the drinking I did afterwards or each nite having convinced myself I deserved it. I am currently in day 5 of my latest commitment to live normal. I quit the first time for 16 years (78-94), the 2nd time for 16 months....and now Im in day 5 the 3rd time. Whew! This is without a doubt the hardest time I have had...the cravings incredible. I was convinced a week ago I was self destructing with no recourse. The lesson....if you have stopped don't start. Each time the difficulty to get up the self control compounds. I am glad the running is even motivating for you now that you are sober. That is very cool. Good Luck with your new life. It's Great.

Solutionisme
January 5th, 2009, 08:41 PM
Good Stuff. I'm 57 and read the book in 1974 and ran ever since. I rememeber reading in that book Dr. Cooper claiming if you could keep running for 6 weeks...you would'nt give it up. Very true. The only thing I enjoyed more than running was the drinking I did afterwards or each nite having convinced myself I deserved it. I am currently in day 5 of my latest commitment to live normal. I quit the first time for 16 years (78-94), the 2nd time for 16 months....and now Im in day 5 the 3rd time. Whew! This is without a doubt the hardest time I have had...the cravings incredible. I was convinced a week ago I was self destructing with no recourse. The lesson....if you have stopped don't start. Each time the difficulty to get up the self control compounds. I am glad the running is even motivating for you now that you are sober. That is very cool. Good Luck with your new life. It's Great.
We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience
Teilhard De Chardin

cassy
January 6th, 2009, 03:47 AM
Hi

its a great inspiration to hear you are all sober and getting fit.
My blood pressure is elevated though not yet on medication and I,m going to try the power walking 4 times weekly routine.

i have some broken veins on face..alcohol related no doubt so need to do the skincare stuff.

My diet is planned and full of seasonal fruit and veg with the occasional choc.

so here we go!1 at the age of 54 with 35 yrs drinking under my belt some syuff is irreversible..(like brain shrinkage, liver damage..not confirmed ..just likely after the amount of wine I have consumed.

Maybe my memory will improve..i pretende dit was the menopause effect but deep inside I think its alcohol related

good luck all you people and thatnks for sharing

Cassy

FallenAngel
January 27th, 2009, 09:35 AM
I know that Doubter was pressed for time today, so I have taken the liberty to copy & paste his post from another thread & add it here.


How wonderful it is when our goals become reality!:)

doubter;530321 wrote: Hello all mwoers,

As most of my friends and long timers here know, I found mwo on 1st March last year and have been completely sober, except for a tiny, inconsequential slip on two consecutive days. I thought that I was a social drinker but looking back, my drinking had escalated to a point where I had got involved in a very embarrassing bar room brawl with my drinking buddies. I still feel absolutely mortified reading my first post here, on 1st March 2008.

My first post :

http://www.mywayout.org/community/f79/query-19395.html#post282292

The initial days of the quit were tough, especially because I had to make drastic changes in my lifestyle and also find fulfilling activities to fill the vacuum with. The support and motivation that I received at mwo during the initial phase has been instrumental in keeping my quit going. And I found a lifetime worthy friendship too.

One such activity for which I rediscovered my long forgotten passion was running (Reading and volunteering being the others). Became an adult-onset runner & started running fairly regularly again. Staying away from booze gave me the time, energy and discipline to keep at it. I?ve been posting on and off on the fitness thread about my fitness activities.

We have a Company-organized annual event ? a five km run ? every January. Took part in it last year, and finished with a time of around 28 minutes. True amateur runner time. For the last couple of months, I was preparing for it by running on alternate days. About three weeks ago, the day I had a six km training run , I fell sick in the evening and had serious breathing trouble at night. Went to my physician who, after a battery of tests, diagnosed bronchial asthma. Prescribed medication ( corticosteroid, broncodilator, the textbook treatment ) to be taken for a full month. And of course, asked me to desist from running for the nonce.

I was truly crestfallen at that point of time. I probably took to running to be an important facilitator for my sobriety. Had dreams ( no, a goal) of running atleast a half-marathon by the end of this calendar year. There was a touch of irony in this. All the while that I was a pack-a-day smoker and a two-fisted drinker, I had no major health troubles. And now, after giving up both these debilitating addictions, .I find myself with a presumably chronic disease. Somehow the situation didn?t seem right.

I didn?t run for the last two weeks but was determined to take part in the Race on 24th Jan, even if it meant that I had to walk the whole distance. I started to feel very strongly that my sobriety depended on my taking part.

Cut to race day, 24th Jan. Got up feeling strong and refreshed. Had my morning puff ? of the broncodilator. And was determined to give it my best shot. Joined the other 140 runners at the starting line. When the race started suddenly felt that I was in the ?zone? and felt I had an excellent run. It almost felt that the Run shall probably determine the road I would take regarding my future sobriety.

Finished eighth overall and fourth in my category ( employees under 45). With my personal best ever timing of 24:30 ? a clean three minutes less than I ever achieved !!

The feeling of triumph that I felt at the finish line is indescribable. Almost felt like Rocky Balboa running up the steps of the Philedelphia Art Museum(pardon the imagery ? perils of being a popular- film buff ). Felt like I?ve bested both my addictions- the nicodemon and the al-devil ? and my doctor?s verdict too. Adds to my belief that we can be temporarily defeated, but never destroyed.

What?s the point of putting this insignificant private victory up here in a forum for people with alcohol-related issues? Wouldn?t it be better posting this in a hardcore runners? forum or its equivalent? Or a forum for newbie asthmatics even?

I thought about this. And came to the conclusion that mwo is the perfect place to put up this experience. For a number of reasons. I am now pretty sure that finding mwo has been a life-altering experience for me. Its almost like I was Doubter b.m. (before mwo) and karmayogi a.m. For the past eleven months, a lot of friends have come to know me here at mwo and I too have immensely benefited by knowing them all. Mwo is my second home now.

Also, we come across a lot of newbies coming into mwo, feeling lost and not knowing where to turn to. Just wanted to assure them that I was there too and there is very broad daylight at the end of the tunnel, if only we keep the faith. We can raise above our circumstances.

And of course to thank all the friends here who have accompanied me in my journey of sobriety for the last eleven months. Oh, I can cite the names of a dozen regulars here.

At mwo, I?ve also found a friend for life ? Angel ( Okay, the ?fallen? part of the screenname still, after all these months, sucks. Don?t you agree Angel??lol.)- who has been a wonderful companion and sobriety coach in this journey forward. I really don?t know how to show my gratitude to you, Angel. Thanks for everything.

I know that I still have a hell of a lot of inner work to do. Staying sober gives me the necessary motivation to ?keep at it?.

And for all those who had the patience to go through this novel ? thanks for listening.

Peace to all.

Karmayogi

DianaT
April 7th, 2009, 09:49 PM
Great job

I read your story and felt inspired. I too use to be an avid fitness enthusiast but have lost my way. No wonder I put on 50 lbs. Gee with 1/2 pint of vodka 3 to 4 days a week and the mixers, then the bottles of wine with friends and the hunger you just go for to curb the dizziness in your head. I am taking at least a few months off of booze. I am trying to train for a race (6 mile run and 12 mile bike). I will never get there if I keep drinking like this. My plan is to stop altogether and reset my meter. I would like to be able to do moderation, but I will cross that bridge when I come to it. No alcohol last night. Got up and did 20 min of Pilates today. Took a swim with my daughter after work and then came home to drink a ginger ale.:palm:

FallenAngel
April 8th, 2009, 10:41 PM
Hi DianaT, and welcome to the forum!
I saw your post & wanted to make sure you got a reply. Doubter is out of town this week, but I will certainly tell him that you posted in his thread so that he can get back to you.
Good job on staying away from the booze the last few nights... that's how we do it...One Day At A Time... and before you know it, weeks turn into months. It does get better the more time you put into your sobriety...the rewards are beyond what you could have ever imagined :) I couldn't envision a totally sober life for myself when I first started out... but now I can't imagine wanting my life any other way! Wishing you all the best on your journey back to wellness & serenity :l

Gearhead
July 1st, 2009, 03:08 AM
Hey doubter I've seen my body composition change just from short term heavy alcohol use. I've always been a moderate drinker with the occasional binge but after my ex left in Feb it became binges like every other night. I am 34 and got through most of the divorce working out like a madman with weights. I had worked my way to single digit body fat % and saw it grow by 3% in past couple months. That and I lost lean muscle mass and strength. I am attempting to go AF for a month (to start) and can't wait to feel good again. Thanks for sharing you experiences.

doubter
July 3rd, 2009, 08:08 AM
best wishes!

Gearhead!

Welcome to the mwo community. Congratulations on your decision to go AL-free for a month. That will be a starting point for wonderful changes in your life.

Since I've given up drinking, running and pranayama ( yoga breathing ) have almost become a part of my daily routine. The discipline to stick to my fitness regimen has definitely come about only after giving up drinking. Earlier, I regularly had the problem/ excuse of being hungover early in the morning, but now this excuse is no longer there.

Wish you all the best.
:)

Cinders
July 3rd, 2009, 08:19 AM
Doubter,

It is great to see you and see you are doing so well!!

Thanks for dropping in.

Cindi